Elyse Sewell (elysesewell) wrote,

tsuiddy wah diddy



That's me, looking a tad prognathic on the wall of HK shoe store Staccato. I saw that poster for the first time today and went bounding into the store, pulling out my camera. The solitary clerk approached immediately and told me that photography is forbidden within Staccato walls. "Oh c'mon," I wheedled, "That's me." She eyed me skeptically. I preened modellishly. Cocked my head convincingly. Batted my eyes endearingly.

Having none of it, the clerk leisurely stepped back and gave me a once-over. Hair, shower-damp and uncombed. Face, wild-eyed and makeupless. iPod strap around neck, criminally dorky. Feet, shuffling around awkwardly in decidedly non-Staccato boots. She softened: maybe I wasn't that hot prognathic fox up on the wall, but I was certainly no slick agent of corporate espionage. Ever scrupulous, she still called her supervisor to explain the situation and ask permission before she took this picture. [Confidential to slick agents of corporate espionage: please do not use the information contained in this photograph to facilitate hostile Staccato takeovers and related nefarious deeds.]

I had lunch in Tsui Wah, an awesome HK chain restaurant. The widely varied menu is divided into sections like "Sandwiches/Toast," "Soup," "Hot/Cold Drinks," and this one: "Ice Cream/Sundaes/Oat." The list of items in this category switches abruptly from the likes of "Japanese Green Tea Ice Cream," "Fruit Sundae," to "Beef Oatmeal," "Ham Oatmeal." I am rarely fazed in the face of new and different food items, but my sugary Instant Quaker packet of a soul just can't get used to the idea of savory oatmeal, which, under the name "congee," is a popular Chinese breakfast (edit: Oh, congee is made of rice. Thanks, texasdaijobu). Congee is served as a thin, plain oatmeal porridge (this is sometimes translated as "gruel," by the way, as in "World of Gruel" restaurant in Shenzhen. All true!) with a host of add-ins and toppings on the side. These toppings are as diverse as dried shrimp, salty shredded pork (called "pork floss" or "flossy pork" in English), green onions, preserved eggs, and chopped vegetables. Fie on congee and its dearth of raisins and syrup; my preferred way to kick off a long, hard day of cattle ranching is with a tomato sandwich and HK-style hot milk tea (made with condensed milk...gurgle).

Anyway, here I am making a spectacle by photographing myself in Tsui Wah. I ordered mushrooms and vegetables sauteed with ginger.
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